Shoes: How to Measure & Size Chart

 

 Inches

Men's Shoe Size

 9 1/4"

 6

 9 1/2"

 6.5

 9 5/8"

 7

 9 3/4"

 7.5

 9 7/8"

 8

  10 1/8"

 8.5

  10 1/4"

 9

 10 3/8"

 9.5

10 1/2"

10

10 3/4"

10.5

 10 7/8"

 11

11 1/8"

 11.5

11 1/4"

 12

11 1/2"

 1

 

 Inches

 Women's Shoe Size

 8  1/4"

 4

 8 3/8"

 4.5

 8 1/2"

 5

 8 3/4"

 5.5

 8 7/8"

 6

 9 "

 6.5

 9 1/4"

 7

 9 3/8"

 7.5

 9 1/2"

 8

 9 5/8"

 8.5

 9 7/8"

 9

 10"

 9.5

 10 1/4"

 10

 10 3/8"

 10.5

 10 1/2"

 11

 10 5/8"

 11.5

 11"

 1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 How to Measure for Proper Fitting Shoes

1. Place a white sheet of paper on a hard surfaced floor (not on carpet or rug).

 2. Stand on the paper with while wearing a sock. Sock should not be too thick or thin. Medium thickness is best or wear the socks you will be wearing with your new shoes..

 3. With a pencil draw a line across, at the end of your heel.

 4. Draw another line at the tip of your longest toe.

 5. Draw another mark at the widest part at the sides of your foot.

6. Measure your other foot too. They are usually not the exact same size.

 7. Now measure your heel-to-toe mark, measuring to the exact 1/8 inch.

8. If you find that one foot measures different than the other (that is very normal), always move up to the larger size for a comfortable fit.

9. Submit your measurements and we will be glad to figure the correct size for you. Please specify male or female.

Proper-fitting shoes make all the difference whether you walk or run.

You'll be a few steps ahead of the game armed with some basic knowledge about your feet and their specific needs. Here is some expert advice to heed before buying new footwear:

Don't make shoes multitask . Walking shoes are stiffer; running shoes are more flexible, with extra cushioning to handle greater impact. If you do both activities, get a pair for each one.

Know your foot. Most major brands now offer a model to suit every foot type.

One way to determine your foot's shape is to do a "wet test"--- wet your foot, step on a piece of brown paper and trace your footprint. Or just look at where your last pair of shoes shows the most wear.

If your footprint shows the entire sole of your foot with little to no curve on the inside -- or if your shoes show the most wear on the inside edge -- it means you've got low arches or flat feet and tend toward overpronation -- meaning your feet roll inward. Overpronation can create extra wear on the outside heel and inside forefoot. You'll want a shoe  featuring maximum support.

If the footprint shows only a portion of your forefoot and heel with a narrow connection between the two -- or if your shoes wear out mostly on the outside edge -- you have high arches and tend to underpronate (also called supinate), meaning your feet roll outward. Underpronation causes wear on the outer edge of the heel and the little toe. Look for a cushioned shoe with a soft midsole.

You have a neutral arch if your footprint has a distinct curve along the inside and your shoes wear out uniformly. Look for a "stability" shoe, which has the right mix of cushioning and support

Feet Change. Measure your foot frequently. It's a myth that foot size doesn't change in adults. It does change as we get older, so have your feet measured twice a year. Sizes also vary between brands, so go by what fits, not by what size the shoe is.

Shop toward the end of the day. Feet swell over the course of the day; they also expand while you run or walk, so shoes should fit your feet when they're at their largest.

Bring your own socks -- the ones you wear while running or walking. If you wear orthotics, bring those, too. Shoes need to fit with the orthotic inside.

Don't believe in breaking in. Running and walking shoes should feel comfortable right away. Walk or run around  a bit to make sure they feel good in action.

Use the rule of thumb. There should be about 3/8-1/2 inch between the front of your big toe and the end of the shoe -- about a thumb's width. The heel should fit relatively tightly; your heel should not slip out when you walk. The upper part of the shoe -- which goes over the top of your foot -- should be snug and secure, and not too tight anywhere. The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons writes that when fitting in to an athletic shoe you should be able to freely wiggly all of your toes when the shoe is on.

Know when to replace them.  Go by how your shoes look and feel. Once the back of the sole is worn out or the shoe feels uncomfortable or less supportive, it's time to replace them.